, , , , , , , , ,

Endovascular Techniques for Management of Brain Aneurysms: Conceptual Animation Videos

Endovascular Coiling of Brain Aneurysm




Endovascular coiling or endovascular embolization is a minimally invasive technique performed to treat brain aneurysms. The goal of the treatment is to block blood flow into the aneurysm and therefore reduce the risk of aneurysm rupturing.

In this procedure, a catheter guided by a wire is inserted through the femoral artery at the groin and threaded all the way to the affected brain artery. The guide wire is removed. A micro-catheter carrying a soft platinum coil is introduced inside the initial catheter and is navigated into the aneurysm opening. The coil is then deployed into the aneurysm sac. A small electrical current is passed to detach the coil from the catheter. It may take several coils to fill the aneurysm. The coils induce blood clotting inside the aneurysm and seal it off from the artery.

In some cases, when the neck of the aneurysm is too wide, a stent may be used to keep the coils within the aneurysm sac. Stent-assisted coiling involves permanently placing a stent in the artery prior to coiling. The stent acts as a scaffold inside the artery to help holding the coils in place.


Flow Diverter Placement for management of Brain Aneurysms




Flow diversion is a newer endovascular technique used to treat brain aneurysms. The procedure involves placing a flow-diverting device - a specially designed metal mesh tube - in the blood vessel adjacent to the aneurysm to divert blood flow AWAY from the aneurysm.

In this procedure, a catheter guided by a wire is inserted through the femoral artery at the groin and threaded all the way to the affected brain artery. The guide-wire is removed. A micro-catheter carrying the flow-diverting device is introduced inside the initial catheter and is navigated PAST the aneurysm opening, without entering it. The device is then deployed across the neck of the aneurysm.

The tube slows and eventually stops blood flow into the aneurysm, which, over time, is believed to shrink and disappear.

Flow diversion is particularly useful for treatment of large or wide-neck aneurysms where coiling may be difficult to perform. It is also more suitable for treating un-ruptured aneurysms due to the fact that the device and the catheter system do NOT need to enter the aneurysm itself. This significantly reduces the risk of the aneurysm rupturing during the procedure.

0 comments:

Post a Comment

Please let us know what you think about this post

Topics